To Win the War and Lose the Peace

  • 14 Feb 2009 05:54:23 GMT

    [`Genuine power sharing agreement`.I don`t thing it will ever happen in Sri Lanka with the present government, if the prevailing political situation continues]

    Crap. What power you need to share? Labba. We need equality. What Sri Lankan people need is a decent life not stupid power. Let politicians keep it and leave people alone.

  • 14 Feb 2009 11:32:15 GMT

    [In the case of ethno-nationalist guerrilla movements such as the LTTE, a group once it looses territory may melt into the people and return years or decades later to fight -- if the root causes of the conflict are not addressed.]

    True. The greater danger however, is the Sinhala chauvinists getting emboldened by the military success against the LTTE and attempting to impose their will on the minorities. This will be the real test for the President. Will he succumb to the chauvinists or convince them of the futility of their thinking, failing which confront them boldly in the greater interests of the country.

    If he chooses the latter course, he will certainly be remembered as one of the greatest, if not the greatest, leaders of this country. Lets wait and see

  • 14 Feb 2009 13:07:06 GMT

    [if the root causes of the conflict are not addressed]

    Root cause what is that.........?

    Oh...Yes....sorry.... there is one. That is Tamil racism. Remember 50-50 mania. There is no political solution for that. Only military if it comes again..

  • 14 Feb 2009 19:58:15 GMT

    P007 don`t mix up chauvinism with patriotism. Do brand the people who speak in favour of the motherland Sri Lanka as chauvinists? Then, what will you call the people who don`t even call our country by it`s official name Sri Lanka? They call it Ilankei. You will have to call them Parayas then.

  • 14 Feb 2009 20:52:39 GMT

    When whole world is trying to defeat terrorism This British So called PP, shame to the commonwealth countries. trying to chalange a democratic country by one sided appointment of an envoy to an internal matter. Was Sri lanka against of Britain when you fight with Irish terrorists. Try solveyou problem in England we cantake care of our problems.

  • 14 Feb 2009 23:37:25 GMT

    Sirka,

    `Ilankai` is the Tamil word for Lanka, look closely and you will see. It is unnecessary to swear, especially when you do not understand or appreciate what someone else has to say. From what you say it sounds as if you are calling all the Tamils parayas - which I hope is not you are saying. It is this sort of half witted talk that has lead to the sorry state of our country. Considering what we say before we say it, will go a long way.

  • 15 Feb 2009 00:16:43 GMT

    [Root cause... what is that?]

    LTTE are probably facing what they deserve for the brutal manner in which they went about doing their business. But to think they exist without cause is to bury our heads in the sand. That Sri Lanka does not treat all its citizens equally is a fact. Most Tamils do feel that they are second class citizens in Sri Lanka regardless of their support or not of the LTTE.

    Tamils of Indian origin who were born here and whose parents were born here were refused citizenship and shipped back to India to die in camps after serving Sri Lanka as poorly paid estate workers for generations. Perhaps they lied down and took it, but not all would do the same. This is an example of a root cause.

    This sort of mistreatment stems from thinking of Tamils or other minorities as others. To be a united Sri Lanka, everyone must feel and be made to feel that they are `us`. You cannot treat `others` as second class people and expect them to feel the `unity`.

    However much it may have been necessary to destroy the LTTE, not to protect civilians, let alone actively attack them, or for people in power to talk of Sri Lanka as belonging to the Sinhalese people, and that others must take what they are given, only strokes violence. This attitude which finds expression in a multitude of ways is the root cause.

  • 15 Feb 2009 01:05:10 GMT

    [I don`t THING it will ever happen in Sri Lanka with the present government]

    Given LEELANADA`s name, I THING he is a Sinhala :o

  • 15 Feb 2009 02:03:57 GMT

    Sirka

    By chauvinists, I am referring to those Urumaya people who are hell bent on Sinhalising the East by erecting Buddha statues in areas where there are no Buddhists, by forcing people to move out of areas from where they were eking out their livelihood on various pretexts, by trying to prevent construction of houses for Tsunami victims by making false representations to the President and when that failed blocking the allocation of houses to the victims by invoking the Supreme Court etc. etc. These people are just as bad as the Tamil racists who want to divide the country. They are even worse because it is these people who give rise to the other racists by giving them the casus belli

  • 15 Feb 2009 13:09:32 GMT

    [Most Tamils do feel that they are second class citizens in Sri Lanka regardless of their support or not of the LTTE.]

    ANON,

    Tamils (to that matter, everyone) are entitled to have their own feelings about the way they are being treated. However, the reasons why Tamils feel they are being treated as second class citizens is not because they have actually been treated as second class citizens. Reason for that is people like you who keep repeating the same myth(s) fabricated by the forefathers of Tamil Racism thereby convincing ordinary masses (both Tamil and Sinhalas) that Tamils have been racially discriminated.

    There is no doubt we should do whatever it takes to make our minorities feel they well and truly belong to this country. However, admitting to crimes that we have never committed can hardly be considered as a good step in that direction, unless we are trying to please some separatist chauvinistic elements who are at the very bottom of the question.

    Let`s analyse the so called root cause you have come up with in response to RSWKV.

    [Tamils of Indian origin who were born here and whose parents were born here were refused citizenship and shipped back to India to die in camps after serving Sri Lanka as poorly paid estate workers for generations. Perhaps they lied down and took it, but not all would do the same. This is an example of a root cause.]

    All those Tamils with recent Indian origins were taken here by British as their subjects and not by any of the post independent Sri Lankan governments with Sinhala majority as they call it these days (even though no one speaks about UK governments with English dominance). It is true that they worked under harsh conditions. However, there is no point blaming the Sinhalas for their hardships since it is something they inherited from previous British administration which made these people to work under slave-like conditions. In contrary you should thank up country Sinhalas for not demanding these people to leave their plantations established on the traditional lands of Sinhalas, which were unashamedly acquired by British under number of land reclamation acts throughout 1800s.

    What happened at the independence was Sri Lankan state had to decide who their subjects are. As agreed during pre-independence Indo-Ceylon discussion (from 1940 onwards), the Sri Lankan state, in the form of Citizenship Act of 1948, agreed to grant the c citizenship to all the Indians who have been lived in Sri Lankan continuously for more than two generations (having lived in UK, you should know by experience that *working hard under harsh conditions* is hardly considered a qualification when granting someone with British citizenship). What is paramount in this regards is, Tamis with recent Indian origins always remained a moving population between Sri Lanka and India and a condition like that deemed quite fitting under those circumstances (To quote you some statistics, between the years 1921 and 1951, some 2 million people were brought in from India while 1.7 million people have left the country (to India)). Under that criterion only about 5000 people qualified to become Sri Lankan citizens. Due to the sheer lack of Indians who qualified to remain in the island, Sri Lankan government took a more generous step through the Indian and Pakistani Residents (Citizens) Act of 1949 (No: 48). Based on this Act, a further 134,000 qualified to become Sri Lankan citizens. These were the people who had had continuous residence here for 7 years (in the case of married persons) or for 10 years (in the case of unmarried persons) starting from the year 1940.

    What is with utmost importance in this connection is India, as first agreed during aforementioned pre-independence Indo-Ceylon discussion and then by the Article 8 of Indian Constitution, always accepted these people as their citizens. Therefore, if any of those Indian citizens who were brought in by British, have died as a consequence of sending them back to their country of citizenship, it is certainly beyond the control of Sri Lankan state, as they were an intermediary party to a problem between British and Indians.

    -Muchalinda

    .