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Slender loris (Unahapuluwa) seen after 72 years

Monday, 19 July 2010 - 7:26 PM SL Time



(Colombo Lankapuvath) One of Sri Lanka`s rarest, Slender Loris (Unahapuluwa) who was considered to as an extinct was found from the Horton Plains after the lapse of 72 years.

A group of researchers from the Colombo University and Open University conducting engaged in an expedition came across several of these rare species from the areas.

Speaking to Lankapuvath leader of the research group Saman Gamage said that one of the kind was captured, photographed and then released to the wild again.

The Horton Plains slender loris was to be seen 04 times between 1939 and 2002 and they disappeared from time to time where it was believed that it completely disappeared due to extinct.

The species can be categorized in to two groups, the Red Slender Loris and the gray and the one found in Horton Place is called the red slender loris said Mr Saman Gamage. It is classified by the IUCN Red List as Endangered.

Gamage added that the species is considered to be among the 25 species endangerment and evolutionary distinctness. It is placed as the number 22 species facing extinct in the world of mammals.

Slender lorises are small nocturnal primates which are only found in the tropical forests of southern India and Sri Lanka.

They are about 6-10 inches long (15cm-25cm) and have large saucer-like eyes which help their night-time hunting. The slender loris` round head is dominated by two large, closely set, saucer-like brown eyes. They flank a long nose which ends in a heart-

shaped knob. The eyes are surrounded by dark-brown to black circles of fur, while the bridge of the nose is white and has a small, narrow lower jaw. The ears are large and round. Its coat is light red-brown or gray-brown on its back and dirty white on its chest and belly. The fur on its forearms, hands and feet is short. The slender loris has small finger nails on its digits. The second digit on the hand and foot are very short. They move on the same plane as the thumb, which helps them grasp branches and twigs.

The team of researchers including Dr U K G K Padmalal of the Open University and Professor S W Kotagama of the University of Colombo are conducting further research into the species and its existence which was caught on camera after 72 years.

Source(s)
http://www.lankapuvath.lk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=8192:slender-loris-unahapuluwa-seen-after-72-years&catid=46:general&Itemid=70

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ThinKing
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LK Information  19 Jul 2010 12:30:10 GMT  Report for Abuse  

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/wildlife/7897057/Horton-Plains-Slender-Loris-pictured-for-first-time.html

Horton Plains Slender Loris pictured for first time
One of the world s rarest primates driven to the brink of extinction by Britain's taste for tea has been photographed for the first time, scientists said.

The Horton Plains slender loris has been so elusive for more than 60 years scientists believed the wide-eyed mammal had become extinct.

It had only been seen four times since 1937 but was fleetingly spotted in 2002 by researchers who identified it by the reflection of a light shone in its eyes.

Experts believe the prime reason for its rarity was due to the loss of its natural forest habitat largely destroyed by the drive to create tea plantations.

Now scientists from the Zoological Society of London's (ZSL) edge of existence programme have managed to capture the world's first pictures of the rare animal during research aimed at quantifying how many species remain in the wild.

The picture of the endangered mammal shows an adult male Horton Plains slender loris, characterised by short limbs and long dense fur, sitting on a forest branch.

It was captured after more than 1,000 night time surveys in Sri Lankan forests taken during 200 hours of painstaking work.

The team not only took pictures of the animal but also captured three live specimens long enough to measure them.

'We are thrilled to have captured the first ever photographs and prove its continued existence - especially after its 65-year disappearing act, said Dr Craig Turner, a ZSL conservation biologist.

Slender lorises, officially known as Loris tardigradus nycticeboides, are small nocturnal primates which are only found in the tropical forests of southern India and Sri Lanka.

They are about 6-10 inches long (15cm-25cm) and have large saucer-like eyes which help their night-time hunting.

Estimates suggest there are just 100 of the endangered creatures left in the wild, putting it among the world's top five most threatened primates.

But researchers admitted that so little was known about them that numbers could in fact be below 60, which would make them one of the rarest breeds in the world.


looks like SL researchers and ZSL both doesnt like to acknowledge/credit each other for the finding..
LankaTileke
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LK Information  19 Jul 2010 13:42:26 GMT  Report for Abuse  
both doesnt like to acknowledge


Sri Lankans cannot be expected to be interested in Unahapuluva in 1920s, nor in 2000s. It should probebly be an Englishmen.

If it was a research on a blonde, somewhat credit could be handed to Sri Lankans.
ogimA
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LK Information  19 Jul 2010 13:44:01 GMT  Report for Abuse  
Looks like a Bakamoona
Dewey
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LK Information  19 Jul 2010 14:50:57 GMT  Report for Abuse  
This is great news. Otherwise unahapuluwa can be only found in literature and in stamps. Hope they create a big enough reserve for their well being and habitat. They should do more research on their food etc and find ways to increase the numbers.

Edited By - Dewey - 19 Jul 2010 14:51:36 GMT
tintin
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LK Information  19 Jul 2010 16:06:45 GMT  Report for Abuse  
This is one of four slender loris subspecies in SL, and I think all are called unahapuluwa. All are endangered, the Horton Plains one is the rarest and thought to have been extinct until this finding. http://www.primate-sg.org/sri.lanka.spp.htm
ogimA
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LK Information  19 Jul 2010 16:29:17 GMT  Report for Abuse  
Adeh, this is in yahoo main news also :)
pmala85
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LK Information  29 Aug 2010 08:55:40 GMT  Report for Abuse  
Few years (nearly three) earlier, I saw an animal just similar to this around 1 am inside the open area of our roof selling. After seen this animal I got so frightened. It walked very slowly and got steel when I made a noise to scatter it away. It didn't move a single step, so I switched off the lights and went to sleep.
After I read this article only I got to know this is the animal that I saw few years back and it s in red list. Now I m way from Sri lanka, but I asked from my mother and she told that she has saw that animal few months back.
I would like to invite researches to explore this area before this animal get disappears from our planet.
areas: Athurugiriya, Pore,Boralugoda
ThinKing
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LK Information  30 Aug 2010 03:33:13 GMT  Report for Abuse  
Pmala85,
I saw an animal just similar to this around 1 am inside the open area of our roof selling.

It's quite possible to be a 'Kalavedda' (no no, not the variety Sarath F was refering to, the real thing) or the palm civet. Usually the guy refered in this article can only be found in upcountry as far as I know..

http://thewebsiteofeverything.com/img/Asian_palm_civet.jpg
ruwan791
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LK Information  5 Dec 2011 11:16:16 GMT  Report for Abuse  
I saw an animal in kalawana pothupitiya area 2011.12.04
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